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20121223
20121223
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> the city is tied up in knots over the so-called fiscal cliff. what are the foreign policy implications? >> one of the things i always find in congress is the minute we have budgetary restrictions -- before we even knew the word cliff with regard to this -- makes great rhetoric or demagoguery to say, we need money for at home. we do not need money for around the world. it always gets applause and it is great. but the truth is that the united states needs to be engaged around the world because we are the world power. we are a superpower, and we have interests. foreign aid, all it does other countries could, also does as good. -- although it does other countries good, it also does us good. i worry about -- if you take foreign aid that is less than 1% of the u.s. budget, if he did a survey amongst the population, i think it is 15% -- they think it is 15% and should be cut. if we start cutting foreign aid, cutting security for our diplomats around the world, being penalized and pound foolish, i think as a world power we need to maintain a robust foreign policy and make sure our people are p
personally is that 18 years ago the city of charleston county county-wide gave me an opportunity to represent him based on values and issues. a couple of years later the folks from the house gave me an opportunity to represent their issues and their values. two years ago the first district gave me an opportunity to represent their issues and values. what i've not ever heard on the campaign trail was besides the fact that you're black or because you're black, here's what we want to do. they've asked me questions about values and issues, and that's an amazing thing. i think it speaks to the evolution of south carolina and of our nation. it speaks to the heart of the good people in our nation and specifically of our state. i would say this -- more importantly than the complexion that i have, i think back to growing up in a single-parent household. i'd love to speak to the single moms out there and say don't give up on your kids. it may get tough, it may be challenging, but all things are truly possible in this nation. i was speaking with jim clyburn, another part of the family here. i was talkin
effectiveness. the partisan rank that too oftendom nates this city was unaccept to believe him. his focus was on people, on the infrastructure they depend on in the communities, on the must vulnerable. he was a giant here in the senate, he was a mountain back home. hawaii would not be hawaii without dan inouye. he fought for his state. he would not allow it to be ignored and he made it a better place to live and work for generations to come. mr. president, as a senator from another state far from washington d.c. i learned a lot from him about how to advocate for the people who elect you and make sure they never get lost here in the mix. through his quiet and shiney example we learned about bipartisan ship. we all learned a bit more about effectiveness. he knew how to get things done more than anyone i have seen before or will since. we learned a bit more about hume illty. you never here danny talk about himself. we learned about respect, kindness towards all, not just those who agree with you. and he helped us remember every single day why he came here in the first place. yath you how man
visited rod page, a young woman's leadership academy in the harlem area of new york city, one of the first and most successful pilot projects for girls public schools. i remember the time i invited senator barbara to texas. we have worked together for so many years. we worked together on the appropriations committee for nasa. i wanted her to see the great work that they are doing their. -- there. then i took her to the houston rodeo. i want her to see the texas altculture. i'm not sure if she knew exactly how people would dress at the rodeo. suffice it to say, there were a lot of rhinestones and cowboy boots and day care and big cath. -- big hair and big hats. she said to me, if we were here on monday and went to the chamber of commerce --these people look like -- uch.i said, yeah, pretty m we want to make sure that our stay at home moms and dads and the same opportunity for security savings as those who work outside of the home have. it has been a huge success. we also cosponsored the national breast and cervical cancer early protection program. she is a skilled legislator and a dear frie
on the south side of the city of chicago. and i am a pastor of my church. i am here to support hr 308. the large capacity ammunition device act which i have been a co-sponsor of since march of last year. hearing reports that there are 264,000 -- rifles manufactured each year in the u.s. and of those a 5,443 are exported overseas and 248,000 are used right here in the u.s. a bitter irony that we are confronted with at sandy hook is that the firearm industry's association their headquarters are located just across the highway from the sandy hook elementary school and while focusing on large capacity weapons is important, i also have a bill, hr 66 a. legislation aimed at establishing a nationwide system for prohibiting unlicensed gun ownership and granting the u.s. attorney general broader authority on the program. as sad as the sandy hook incident is for all of us, we must be cognizant of the fact that gun violence has been terrorizing neighborhoods in chicago, detroit, houston, washington washington, d.c. for over decades now. one of my local newspapers, the "chicago tribune," reports
to the republican line from new york city. caller:hi, i am a physician and worked in the time of son of sam and i treated one of his last victims. the destruction that a sudden killing like this is enormous. i think the mental health screening has to be more pori part of this. the fact that we cannot commit people showing extreme mental illness with several rights laws is a deeper issue than gun control. >host: how should vice president joe biden and the white house address this. mental illness is part of the debate and will be part of the solution. >> i think they really need to look at civil rights laws and be able to intervene more aggressively with mental health professionals when people show a consistent pattern of mental illness. i think you can travel through any city in america and see massive amounts of people who are not capable of taking care of themselves. as a society, we are not humanitarian when we leave them to defend themselves. >host: this argument is not new. it is highlighted in the extensive report in "the washington post." the chair of the senate judiciary committee, joe bid
new york city. caller: obama was quite intelligent on that first debate because he let romney state his entire case. most people cannot remember that many facts and it must have given obama a chance to check off the facts. he josh credibility just by appearing on the stage, so for going word for word it just up to the answer -- upped the ante. he let the press do his talking about a 47% for the rest of the week. he let the press carry aloft for him. host: glenn thrush. guest: they should have hired you to do these been. i'm from new york and i used to play in the schoolyard. there was no intention for it to go down that way. the stock out the words was just -- the staff was ashen faced. they did not know it at the time. host: stuart stevens loved the idea of having an american icon as a warm-up act. they had been assured that clint eastwood would more or less played by their rules but they had not enforced any discipline. he delivered a bizarre rambling lecture to an empty chair that became an instant you to classic and not in a good way. guest: he and the campaign manager for ronny
at the clock in the evening when he was late coming home from dinner in a city where troops guarded the lines between east and west and the rubble of war was still very fresh. my father knew that what he was doing was worth whatever the risk might have been, and so do the foreign service personnel that we send over the world today. they need to be accessible to the people on the ground. they want those people to see and touch the face of america. it is no understatement that our diplomats are on the frontlines of the world's most dangerous places. they leave their families behind, they miss holidays, they risk their safety to make the world safer, and to protect the interests of our country. they do not join the foreign service to get rich, and sadly, many of them, their names are only learned when a tragedy like benghazi takes place. our diplomats do not wear a uniform, but they swear the same oath as the men and women of our armed forces, and their sacrifice is no less important. take note, everybody, as we learned yesterday, the board's report calls for an investment of $2.3 billion a year
year, one half of all children in new york city will be bored to indigent parents. host: your point in all this? caller: my point is, the money that is being spent on these other entitlement programs have to be cut because these people are able to get out of work and make a nice living, whereas the elderly cannot. guest: i think the main thing to pay it to do about the federal budget -- and this is something that people say flippantly some times. at the u.s. government is an insurance company with an army. when we talk about the insurance company part, we are talking about medicare and social security, and to some degree medicaid. those are programs that benefit the middle class and the poor, mainly through retirement. the other thing that people talk about, those are very small parts in the federal budget compared to medicare and social security. really, is not a question of needing to cut these programs. it is that they are growing more quickly than the economy, larger than they have been in the past, and what we need to decide as a nation is, are willing to pay substantially high
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)